Schedule (to change)

August 24: Introductions

what is multimodal composition and why should you care?; overview of class syllabus and projects; what YOU value in students & teachers

in-class

homework:

  1. By Wednesday, August 31 at 8am, complete the syllabus-response blog post (see Home page for details).
  2. Read chapter1_revision of Making Multimodal Projects
  3. Read The New London Group’s, “A Pedagogy of Multiliteracies
  4. Read Gunther Kress’s Multimodalities (21 pages)
  5. NCTE Guidelines for Multimodal Literacies (online; 1pg)
  6. optional reading: Palmeri, “Opening” (pdf; 29pp. ds)

 

August 31: The Language(s) of Multimodality

putting language to new genres/texts/modes/media; getting our hands dirty with technology

in class:

  • introductions: class values & expectations discussion
  • discussion of readings: what IS multimodality? what do you need/want to know? how do modes work?
  • hands-on assignment (?)

homework:

  • Read chapter2_revision of Making Multimodal Projects
  • Read “visualizing composition” (password provided in class)
  • By 8am Wednesday, Sept. 7, respond to the blog post assignment, “Explaining Multimodality” (see Home page)


September 7: Reading & Analyzing Multimedia

How do we read multimedia? what do you take away from it?

in class:

  • What is a rhetorical analysis? (class discussion)
  • Design Concepts: Shifting terminologies… (ix)
  • Does the process of analysis change when considering multimedia texts?
  • In-class analysis: “This is Scholarship” (Braun & Gilbert, from Kairos 12.3)
  • Did we leave anything out of our understanding/reading of this text by limiting ourselves to rhetorical analysis?
  • homework overview

homework:


September 14: Publication Venues
& Webtext Genres

disciplinary conversations; values in digital writing studies (as a discipline); webtexts & your values?

in-class

  • discuss venues and disciplinary values (small groups: post to group)
  • disciplinary conversations: what are people saying in these journals? (“English Downfall” by amishaugur)
  • what is scholarship? what are webtexts? how do they work? when do they work?

homework (updated version):

 

September 21: Peer Review & Disciplinary Values

in class:

  • peer-review process of scholarly multimedia; what are the field’s values?
  1. Watkins’ “Words are the Ultimate Abstraction
  2. Miles et al.’s (2003) Violence of Text
  3. texts outside of Kairos? outside of scholarly multimedia?
  • discuss/write a Values & Criteria Analysis (see under Assignments)
  • what do you value that’s not necessarily a part of the field’s values? starting a short-list
  • peer-review letters (examples & assignment)
  • choose Tech Review options

homework

  • Complete the Peer-Review assignment (due by NEXT WED.)
  • Read Chapter 3 of Making Multimodal Projects
  • Read “The Art of ALT: Toward a more accessible Web” by John Slatin (pdf) slatin-ALT
  • Complete the Tech Review assignment (due in TWO Wednesdays)


September 28: Class cancelled

 

October 5: Crafting Your Idea

what technologies do you need to make scholarly multimedia? how does that choice depend on what your project idea is?

in class:

  • Tech Reviews
  • brainstorming ideas for a scholarly multimedia project
  • technology and accessibility issues
  • discuss Pitch assignment

homework:

  • complete your pitch presentation for class next Wednesday (see Pitch assignment)
  • review Chapter 3 of Making Multimodal Projects (which you read last week)

 

October 12: Choosing Your Projects

so… what’s your idea?? and how do you get r done?

in-class

  • pitches
  • voting on project topics
  • BREAK
  • choosing groups
  • discuss proposals (what ARE proposals? what rhetorical work do they do?)
  • team contracts
  • meet with groups to strategize workflow

homework:

 

October 19: Creating Designs & Researching

in class:

  • overview of proposals (needs, troubleshooting, etc.)
  • discussion of storyboarding/prototyping your project
  • research assignment (get Cheryl to approve your article choices)
  • group work: storyboards and research needs
  • IRB protocols

homework:

optional readings:

October 26: Copyright Issues & Asset Collection

in-class:

  • discussion of research, assets, copyright, Fair Use, and permissions issues (Eric Faden’s “Fair(y) Use Tale“)
  • review of storyboards/mock-ups

homework:

  • gather project assets (e.g., media components you need to build your project) — have in digital format by the time class starts next week
  • start rough cut of project; due by end of class next week

November 2: Large-Scale Editing

clarifying purpose of project through rough-cut review; trimming, editing, timing, revising, testing…

in-class:

  • how to organize your assets
  • importing and logging digital assets into software
  • creating a rough cut (organized version of roughly edited clips according to workplan/storyboard/script) of your project in your chosen software program

homework:

  • continue working on project
  • write a group progress report (due by 9am next Wed!)

November 9: Small-Scale Editing

putting everything together

in-class

  • group work on editing

homework:

  • continue working on project

November 16: Refining Your Project

in class:

  • work on projects

homework:

  • have projects ready to workshop by beginning of class on November 30

++++++++++++++

THANKSGIVING: Nov. 23

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November 30: Peer-Review

in class:

  • talk about how to choose how to revise based on letters
  • discuss submission email assignment
  • workshop classmates’ projects using peer-review criteria

homework:

  • finish/send peer-review letters by Friday night
  • email me how you plan to revise your group project based on the feedback by Monday 
  • complete annotation of peer-review letter by class next Wednesday

December 7: Revisions & Reflections

  • discuss class reflection assignment
  • evaluations
  • work on project revisions or class reflections in class, if needed

homework:

Tuesday, December 13: Exam Time (3:10-5:10pm)